Pros and Cons of Going Tankless

If you are pondering whether or not to go tankless for your next water heater, we are here to help you decide with some pros and cons. Read on to learn more!

First, let’s establish the two types of water heaters – traditional and tankless. Traditional water heaters store and preheat on average 30 to 50 gallons of water in a tank. This water is used whenever someone does laundry, showers, washes dishes, etc. As the water is used, the tank refills and reheats again. Tankless water heaters use a heat source, like electricity or gas, to warm cool water on demand whenever you need it, rather than storing it.

We’ve done the research for you to help you decide if a tankless water heater will fit the needs of your home.

VH-Blog-Divider-Pro-v1

  • Energy savings – tankless water heaters use 30 to 50 percent less energy than units with tanks. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates gas-fired tankless water heaters save each year an average of $100 in energy costs and about $44 in electricity bills, compared to traditional water heaters.
  • On demand – referred to as “on demand” because they heat water only when you turn on the faucet; you no longer have to pay to keep 30-50 gallons of hot water on hand.
  • Continuous supply of hot water – this is ideal if you have a family member that uses up all the hot water taking extra-long showers, or if you need to fill a Jacuzzi tub. If more capacity is needed, multiple tankless heaters can be hooked up together.
  • Compact design – smaller than a standard water heater and can be mounted on an interior or exterior wall.
  • Warranty – tankless water heaters typically have a 15+ year warranty, while traditional models only come with a six-year warranty on average.
  • Environmental benefits – besides wasting less energy, you are also preventing a rusty tank from ending up in a landfill when you go the tankless route.
  • Life expectancy – most tankless water heaters last well over 20 years, about twice as long as traditional models.
  • Tax rebates – many gas-powered tankless water heaters qualify for a $300 federal tax rebate, and many states offer similar incentives.

VH-Blog-Divider-Con-v1

  • Upfront cost – at initial purchase and install you will see a higher bill than if you chose a traditional water heater.
  • Special venting requirements – tankless units have high-powered burners, requiring a dedicated, sealed vent system that has to be installed by a professional.
  • Utility conversion – if your home utilities are electricity-only, your electrical system may need an upgrade, which requires hiring an electrician to ensure the proper voltage, amperage, and circuit breaker are in place.

The most important thing to remember when selecting your next water heater is to consider your household’s needs first. Select the unit that best fits your water usage, lifestyle, and budget. Be sure to get an estimate on installation as well as equipment, and have your water heater professionally installed. Unless you are a professional, this is not a do-it-yourself job. To further discuss options with our plumbing experts and what might fit your home best, contact us via our website or call 701.775.4675.